What does a volunteer firefighter do?

The main responsibilities of a Volunteer Firefighter are to assist people in distress, rescue fire victims and extinguish fires as quickly as possible. To accomplish these goals, a Volunteer Firefighter must perform a wide range of tasks.

Do volunteer firefighters make anything?

Volunteer firefighters freely volunteer their efforts as a way of serving and giving back to their community. They often do not receive monetary compensation from the fire department. If they are paid, it is typically in the form of small stipends or annual bonuses.

Is a volunteer firefighter a real firefighter?

Are Volunteer Firefighters Real Firefighters? Yes. They are just as much real firefighters as any career firefighters. … A volunteer firefighter may face some additional challenges while they carry out their job but they are certainly a real firefighter.

Is being a volunteer firefighter worth it?

Is it Worth Being a Volunteer Firefighter? Most volunteer firefighters would agree that it is worth it and that they enjoy what they do. It isn’t for everyone, but it can be very rewarding. It can also give you valuable experience that can help to become a paid firefighter, if that is your goal.

Why are volunteer firefighters not paid?

Once a firefighter is no longer a volunteer, then FLSA rules on minimum wage and overtime apply. Under the FLSA, volunteer firefighters can never receive hourly pay. … Volunteers are also limited in the agencies they can serve, since they cannot volunteer services to the employer who pays them.

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Why should I become a volunteer firefighter?

Volunteer first responders help their fellow citizens in times of need. Volunteers enjoy a sense of accomplishment, achievement, and pride in the work they do. You’d learn new skills, make new friends, be a part of a team, give back to the community, and make a real difference.

Does being a volunteer firefighter look good for college?

The lure of joining a volunteer fire department can be considerable for undergraduates, who as part of the 9/11 generation tend to hold firefighters in particularly high esteem. They may also be seeking to take part in some real-world action as a change of pace from the theories of classroom academics.